Navigation

Fraser Island Attractions | QLD

75 Mile Beach

It is not hard to guess how this location got its name. A bloke measured the beach one day and found out that it was 75 miles long. Apart from its length, there are many more impressive things about this rugged stretch of sand on the east coast of Fraser Island. It's where you'll find the Maheno shipwreck, the popular swimming spot known as Champagne Pools and the striking volcanic rock formation of Indian Head. The beach itself is not a safe place to swim due to dangerous currents and a large shark population. It's also a landing strip for light aircraft so be sure to take care when you are cruising along the sand in your four wheel drive.

Central Station

Originally established as a forestry camp when there was logging on world heritage listed Fraser Island, Central Station's beautiful rainforest area houses a display explaining the development of the island and its various flora and fauna. There is also a wealth of information on display along with picnic areas. Central Station has a short boardwalk around Wanggoolba Creek and through the beautiful Fraser Island rainforest.

Eli Creek

Eli Creek, the largest creek on the eastern beach of Fraser Island, pours up to four million litres of clear, fresh water into the ocean every hour. Eli Creek is a popular picnic and swimming spot, with a boardwalk that follows the creek inland through banksia and pandanus. Swimming or floating down the swiftly flowing creek from the bridge at the far end of the boardwalk is an invigorating experience. Take care when driving through the creek on the beach, as its fast-flowing water can gouge out deep channels. At high tide it’s best to take a break and go for a swim until you can cross the creek at the lower end of the beach.

Fraser Island, Great Sandy National Park

More than a million years in the making, World Heritage-listed K'gari (Fraser Island), in the Great Sandy National Park, is a place of incredible natural beauty. Drive and walk through fragrant open woodlands, lush towering rainforests and colourful wallum banksia heathlands. Discover magical perched and mirror lakes nestled in the dunes, climb creeping sandblows, relax in picturesque picnic areas and spend hours on long golden beaches flanking the Great Sandy Marine Park. The island's rich forests, heaths and woodlands are a haven for wildlife, including the world-renowned Fraser Island dingoes. Possibly the purest dingo population in Australia, their conservation and continued welfare is of national significance. Explore K'gari’s shoreline by boat, and slip your canoe or kayak into the calm waters of Pelican and Marloo bays. Try your hand at reeling in a fish for dinner—delicious table fish like whiting, bream, salmon, mangrove jack and flathead are yours for the taking. The Butchulla (Badtjala) Aboriginal people have ancient connections with K’gari (Fraser Island) and continue to walk in the footsteps of their ancestors. K'gari (Fraser Island) is a natural environment and conditions are unpredictable. Before you visit ensure you read the detailed safety information on the national parks web site.

Lake McKenzie

There are many different aspects to Fraser Island, but the awe-inspiring beauty of Lake McKenzie makes it probably the most visited natural site on the island. It is a ‘perched’ lake, which means it contains only rainwater, no groundwater, is not fed by streams and does not flow to the ocean. The sand and organic matter at the base of the lake form an impervious layer, preventing rainwater from draining away. The sand here is pure, white silica and is not only beautiful to look at but feels beautifully soft to walk on. The sand acts as a filter, giving the water its clarity and helping to make the water so pure it can support very little life. The blues and greens of the lake are endlessly fascinating and it's well worth getting up early to look across it in the soft light of dawn. There are great hikers camping facilities here and toilets and cold showers nearby.

Lake Wabby

Lake Wabby is relatively close to the ocean side of Fraser Island and unlike the other lakes, it supports several varieties of fish. It is known as both a window lake and a barrage lake. Window lakes form when the ground level falls below the water table. Barrage lakes form when a sand blow blocks the waters of a natural spring. This phenomenon is easy to see at Lake Wabby. On one side its deep green waters are bordered by a giant sand dune that is slowly moving into the lake. In a century or so, the sand dune's inexorable march westward across Fraser Island will see it completely swallow the lake. Lake Wabby is a popular spot for those exploring the numerous sand dunes on World Heritage Listed, Fraser Island.

Maheno Shipwreck

The Maheno, the most famous of the Fraser Island wrecks, was driven ashore just north of Happy Valley during a cyclone in 1935. Once a well-known trans-Tasman liner, the Maheno was bound for a Japanese wrecking yard when she met her stormy end. Today the hull lies slowly deteriorating in the harsh salt environment, about 10 kilometres north of Happy Valley. The Maheno is a great piece of Australian history and is a must see for those visiting Fraser Island.

The Cathedrals

The Cathedrals on Fraser Island are coloured sand cliffs that have been sculpted by the wind and rain blowing in off the Pacific Ocean. The colours - red, brown, yellow and orange - are spectacular and are best viewed in the early morning light. The size of the cliff faces are a reminder of exactly how large the sand dunes are on Fraser Island. The Cathedrals are situated on 75 Mile Beach approximately 18 kilometres south of Indian Head.